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STart Art Guide -- Othello Station
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STart Art Guide -- Othello Station

Deer pictogram for the Othello station.

MLK and Othello Street, Seattle

 
Rainier Valley Haiku by Roger Shimomura, on display at the Othello station.

Rainier Valley Haiku by Roger Shimomura – located on the NE Plaza, Myrtle Street

Is our culture becoming a melting pot or a tossed salad? Is one condition preferable to the other? The artist asks these questions in a 13-foot-tall sculpture of stacked objects that stimulates public interpretations about immigrant culture in America.

Stormwater Project by Brian Goldbloom, on display at the Othello station.

Stormwater Project by Brian Goldbloom – located on the platform

Inspired by stonework included in Japan's Osaka Castle, eight artist-designed granite stormwater catch basins are integrated both physically and visually into the station. Each piece includes a unique design of water channels interlaced with everyday objects.

Come Dance With Me by Augusta Asberry, on display at the Othello station.

Come Dance With Me by Augusta Asberry – located on the SE Plaza, Othello Street

These lyrical and flowing figures grew out of the artist's passion for dress designing coupled with an interest in African art. Viewers are invited to feel the movement of the dancers and listen for the silent beat guiding the flow of their motion. Artist Keith Haynes completed the painting portion after Asberry's death.

Reeds and Bangles by Norie Sato and Dan Corson, on display at the Othello station.

Reeds and Bangles by Norie Sato and Dan Corson – located on MLK between Henderson and Walden Streets

The tops of the Overhead Contact System poles along the MLK Corridor resemble reeds bending in an eastern breeze. Poles on either side of each station are wrapped with metal "bangles," visually indicating the approaching station.